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Author
Comment
Storygirl
Registered User
(4/2/07 8:35 am)


underground kingdom
While much newer, "The Hollow Kingdom" trilogy by Clare Dunkle features an underworld where the goblins live and whose king must marry a human in order to ensure his race survives.

Rosemary Lake
Registered User
(4/2/07 10:28 am)


warmth and humour -- THE SILVER CHAIR
[[ the warmth and humour of life in the underworld, compared to the sombre life up above. ]]


For the underworld as a place of warmth and humour compared to the world above, see Lewis's THE SILVER CHAIR. The gnomish misshapen 'earthmen', once freed from the witch, are coarse and humourous and want to go down to their own home, Bism, which is a place of warmth and color and spicy smell and 'living gems'.

Lewis used a lot of traditional motifs, so he may have got that from somewhere else, probably medieval or Icelandic/Norse.

Hm, there's warmth and fertility in the underground place of Mother Holle. (And of course in Pellucidar, and some fertility in the vegetable Mungaboo kingdom underground in one of the Oz books, tho I'm not sure if it was actually under Oz.)


MaryCatelli
Registered User
(4/18/07 8:47 pm)


Re: The Underworld in myth, fairytale, fantasy fiction- help
Besides the Twelve Dancing Princesses, a rather nastier version is Kate Crackernuts -- an English version collected by Joseph Jacobs.

maggy moulach
Registered User
(5/16/07 11:12 am)


Re: The Underworld in myth, fairytale, fantasy fiction- help
Often for Celts the afterlife and fairyland are one and the same.

Robert Kirk called fairyland 'The Subterraneans'. Orfeo called fairyland 'The Land of the Dead'.
Fairyland is usually described as underground (accessed through Tors, burial mounds, caves etc).

Keightley theorized that faeries are ancestral spirits akin to Roman Lar.
Allen propozed that they were folk memories of Neolithic dead (hence living in Neolithic burial mounds). This explains leaving offerings of milk etc for fairies as honouring/placating ancestors.

The idea that if you eat fairy food you can't return to the human world is one you will recognise from your Classical speciality! But instead of pomegranates they had apples-Avalon.


In contemporary fiction, Susanna Clarke's 'Norrell and Strange' describes fairyland as a rather sinister place.

Crceres
Registered User
(5/16/07 5:40 pm)


Native American stories
Native American folklore might be too far afield for what you're aiming at, but several tribes have themes of the underworld (or something like it). The Hopi, I think, tell of being led from a past world to this one by Grandmother Spider, via underground passages. And in the Pacific Northwest, some stories set the ocean as a sort of underworld. Mainly with the idea that humans are related to salmon in spirit, and the spirits of salmon return to their underwater villages when their bones are treated properly.

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