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Author
Comment
debrawaxman2000
Registered User
(5/5/07 8:53 pm)


Re: home of the fairies
I am working on a fiction story that involves fairies who live in Ireland. I am trying to decide what to call thome. They live in the otherworld that can be reached through caves and hills in a certain part of the countryside. Mostly I have seen this world referred to as Faerie in modern fiction. I am confused about other more traditional terms for it. Would Sidhe be accurate? What about Tir Nan Og (Land of Youth). Is this generally seen as being somewhere even more seperate from the human world than the Sidhe? Is Tir Nan Og a place that people could get to through caves and hills? Does it exist underground? Any ideas that people have would be very appreciated.

Veronica Schanoes
Registered User
(5/6/07 8:16 am)


Re: home of the fairies
The Sidhe is the name of the people themselves--I don't think it's a place name.

MaryCatelli
Registered User
(5/6/07 11:25 am)


Re: home of the fairies
"Tir Nan Og" is an island, so I doubt it.

I suspect they would call them "fairy hills".

moonway
Registered User
(5/6/07 1:24 pm)


Re: home of the fairies
Since you posted your original email, I've been trying to recall a story involving a princess who goes walking in a certain field. She's accosted by a fairy, who tells her in a hostile voice that the field is not a place for humans. She meets some prince who's been bewitched by the fairies, and tells her that she can save him if she stands by a certain bridge on a certain date and watches the procession of fairies. She'd know him by his armor and his horse, and she had to do certain things to bring him back to the human world.

The point I wanted to make was that Irish stories don't often bother to explain where fairies live... they just seem to be somewhere else during the day and appear during the night.

The easiest place to put them, for the sake of your story is underground. You can see such a device in Kate Crackernuts. This is in line with the traditional mythology of the tribes that founded Ireland. One of them supposedly lived in burrows, and this gave rise to the belief that fairies lived underground.

Islands are also favored places to put fairies, Tir-na-Nog being the most famous example. Breasal, or Hi Breasal is another name for Tir-na-Nog, that you might use since it's less known.

By the way, I have seen "sidhe" used to mean a fairy palace, but most people would take it in the sense of the last post.

Kaleigh Way

mmcphie
Registered User
(5/6/07 2:41 pm)


Re: home of the fairies
The story about the woman who rescued her lover from the fairy queen is the Scottish tale "Tam Lin." There are many, many versions, including a wonderful picture book by Jane Yolen.

Eloise the Fairy Queen
Registered User
(5/11/07 11:53 am)


Home of the Fairies
Hello, I don't know if your story is for children but thought I could help if it is as I am 8.
I love fairies and even have my own web site,
www.fairydell.webitsmart.co.uk
and I know that fairies live in your dreams. They stay there when you are awake and only come into our world when you are asleep. They are sometimes around in the daytime if they come out of a night worker's dream.
Hope this helps,
Love Eloise
Keep believing!

Rosemary Lake
Registered User
(5/12/07 9:34 pm)


thank you!
Eloise, what a lovely site! Thank you for posting it, and good luck!

DawnReiser
Registered User
(5/14/07 3:48 pm)


faerie
Why limit yourself.... There are such lovely legends and myths which can be plucked and molded to suit your story: Atlantis, Lemuria, Avalon (a/k/a Isle of the Blessed or Blessed Isle(s)), Inis Fer Falga, Alfheim. Or, simply, Otherworld. Or reference the name of a medieval fairy poem: Nimphidia. Or use a semi-modern reference to a fraud: Cottingley.

maggy moulach
Registered User
(5/16/07 4:34 pm)


Re: faerie
Sidhe literally means hill: mound or barrow. So it can be the place or the people of the hill.

Irish Fairy Islands: Tir Nan Og (Land of the Young) Tirfo Thuinn (Land Under the Waves), Tir Nam Beo (Land of the Living) Tirn Aill (Otherworld) Mag Mor (Great Plain) Mag Mell (Pleasant Plain) Tir Tairngir (Plain of Happiness) Emhain Abhlach, (Plain of Apples), Emhain (Island of Women) Isle of the Blessed, Inis Subai(Isle of Joy) Týr Tairnigir (the Land of Promise)

Other names: Cockaigne (land of Plenty), Hy Breasil (Best Place) Annywn, Elysium, Elphame, Elfland....uhm, it seems everyone has a name for it! And the Irish have loads!

Edited by: maggy moulach at: 5/16/07 4:44 pm
Crceres
Registered User
(5/16/07 5:26 pm)


Murdoch's Rath
A rath is the term for a grassy area surrounded by some sort of ditch or moat. It has connections to fairies in a similar way to fairy-rings. In the story about Murdoch's Rath, two different men end up spending a night dancing with the fairies. One behaves politely and is rewarded, the other one ends up with his shoes enchanted so he must dance along the roads forever.

Not that "rath" has anywhere near the allure of some of the other names for faery land, but it does have that connection.

Rosemary Lake
Registered User
(5/16/07 6:22 pm)


mome raths?
Hm, and I always thought the mome raths were some kind of creature. Mome raths outgrabe sounds more active than something a grassy patch could do, as well as more plural.
g,d,r....

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