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vanny
Registered User
(11/3/06 6:06 pm)

Text help requested
Hi! I'm new to posting, but have been an impressed reader for some time. I have a quick question and would appreciate any help/ideas: I'm teaching a university course on fairy tales and am using Zipes, Tatar, Warner, etc. This particular course has a certain amount of funds to use for students and I'd like to find a book to send them off into their second semester of college with (perhaps something like a "Fairy Tales as a Guide to Life" kind of a thing!). Any thoughts? Many, many thanks in advance!

Rosemary Lake
Registered User
(11/4/06 3:02 pm)


Max Luthi
Luthi's _The Fairytale as Art Form and Portrait of Man_ is one of my favorite books (along with his _Once Upon a Time_). Here's a sample lifted from the net:

The fairytale hero...has no specific abilities; unlike the animals, which have inborn instincts, he is not equipped by nature for special tasks. (He) is in this way, just as in so many others, a general reflection of man, a being that has in fact been described by contemporary biologists and anthropologists as a deficient creature without specific abilities...There are animals that can swim faster and run better than man, and still others that can fly...but in a roundabout way, he achieves more than all the animals....Prince, princess, and king are especially good representatives of man. They have no special trade; they have no special training, and yet they can do everything.
--Max Luthi, The Fairytale as Art Form and Portrait of Man

Ken McGuire
Registered User
(11/9/06 6:59 pm)

The Classic Fairy Tales
I believe that the power of fairy tales lies in the reading of fairy tales. Where fairy and folk tale criticism and scholarship can easily follow for those who find that the tales make them dream dreams, it seldom works the other way around. I would give students books of tales. If you aren't already using it for a textbook, THE CLASSIC FAIRY TALES, edited by Maria Warner is excellent. The tales range from Straparola to Carter, and are accompanied by just enough introductory information to help the student begin to see the broader picture. It also has a bibliography large enough to keep them searching for books and reading them in their spare time for years to come.

A tangible gift is a wonderful idea, but the most important gift to give your college students in a fairy tale class is for you to convey your enthusiasm, love and respect for the genre (and no easy A's). :rolleyes

vanny
Registered User
(11/10/06 12:06 am)

Re: The Classic Fairy Tales
Many thanks for your help/suggestions; I can assure you that there are no easy A's in my class! We have spent a semester reading the tales critically, using Tatar's THE CLASSIC FAIRY TALES among other academic texts, so I'm not in need of anything like this. As it turns out, however, this fund is set up for just this kind of "send off" for students who are moving into their second semester; rather than let those funds go, I'm hoping to give them another text to explore on their own!

Again, thank you both!

Edited by: vanny at: 11/10/06 12:44 am

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