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Author
Comment
KristynMarie810
Registered User
(11/7/06 10:33 am)

Glass Slipper In Cinderella
I am writing a term paper on the Glass Slipper in Cinderella. I was wondering if anyone on here could give me their interpretations of what the Glass Slipper means. I am going back and forth between the significance of the glass slipper or the significance of the seven dwarfs in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. If anyone has suggestions they would be greatly appreciated. I have some ideas so far ... just need somemore help.

katherine
Registered User
(11/8/06 5:41 am)


Re: Glass Slipper In Cinderella
Hi
I was looking through some surlalune message achives a month of so ago, and someone had written something about why the slipper was glass - it was something along the lines of the fact that glass is transmutable, as in it changes form under certain conditions i.e heat. Its ability to transmute and change form, when applied to the slipper in the story, is symbolic of the transitions that cinderella goes through - a coming of age - a dawning of sexuality - from rags to a ball gown ect. Also glass being so delicate, also adds to the symbolism. Snow white in her glass coffin ect
Have a look in the archive, it still may be there, although i cant find it now!
Kat

Rosemary Lake
Registered User
(11/8/06 6:13 am)

Luthi
Luthi talked a lot about materials characteristic of fairy tales: glass slipper, glass mountain, glass coffin ... gold/silver leaved forest, etc.

As to the theory that 'glass slipper' was an error for 'fur slipper', iirc Luthi says that if it began that way, still glass became part of the canon because glass is more appropriate to a fairy tale -- as well as to a royal ball.

Writerpatrick
Registered User
(11/8/06 7:07 am)

Re: Luthi
I suspect this story originated in China where they once practiced foot binding. The feet of noble women were wrapped to reduce their size. Thus, the slipper, which probably wasn't originally glass but silk, would be small and would only fit a woman whose feet had been bound.

KristynMarie810
Registered User
(11/8/06 11:26 am)

Thankyou
thank you to those who've responded. I'm actually taking a fairytales class and we have to pick out a particular thing and do a research paper on it. I wasn't sure if i was going ot do it on the Glass Slipper in Cinderella, or the Seven Dwarfs in Snow White. I think i'll stick with the Glass Slipper. In many different things i've read so far the Glass slipper is a representation of virginity....so i guess i'll see where that will take me.

Thanks!

Veronica Schanoes
Registered User
(11/8/06 12:32 pm)

Re: Thankyou
The earliest version we have of Cinderella is indeed Chinese, "Yeh-hsien." The glass slipper first appears in Perrault, and I suspect it has something to do with the high value and status of glass at the time--glass was considered more valuable than jewels, and aristocratic women often wore gowns bedecked with small mirrors/pieces of glass.

Clare Regina
Registered User
(11/8/06 2:42 pm)

Re: Thankyou
I think the glass slipper also has something to do with feminine qualities - Cinderella is so graceful and has such a light step, and is such a perfect dancer, that the glass slippers are still intact at the end of the night. It might also have something to do with the method of finding Cinderella at the end - a cloth or leather shoe could be stretched, even shoes of silver or gold are more malleable than hard glass.

aka Greensleeves
Registered User
(11/8/06 2:50 pm)

Re: Thankyou
Wikipedia actually has a nice essay on this topic (keeping in mind that Wikipedia is only a *starting* point for your research; don't rely on it or your grade will suffer), which I stumbled across yesterday when refreshing my memory about the glass slipper/fur slipper issue.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinderella (scroll down to "Variations.")

As an author, I'm inclined to put it down to artistic invention--"glass slipper" sounded exotic, delicate, and valuable, in an over-the-top fanciful way (perhaps his audience was already familiar with the version in gold). Of course, in the 200+ years since Perrault gave us this detail, it could easily have acquired meaning of its own.

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